Monthly Archives: August 2014

Stop U.S. Wars of Occupation and Police Terror!

Re-blogged from: Uhuru.org

 

“…All over the planet—and inside the U.S.—African, Mexican and oppressed peoples are resisting U.S. war, terror and theft of their resources and land.

Black and brown peoples are fighting back against this brutal and profit-driven capitalist system built not on ideals of equality and democracy, but on hideous crimes such as the massive enslavement and commodification of African people, unimaginable genocide of the Indigenous people and colonial violence of massive proportions.

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This system and country rest on a pedestal of torture, terror and humiliation for the benefit of a minority of the human race at the expense of millions and millions of people and their cultures and social systems.

This is how capitalism was born and this is the only way it can continue to function today.

The Uhuru Solidarity Movement offers a solution to the crisis of today’s world.

There is a future for humankind being forged in the ghettos and barrios and oppressed and impoverished communities every place where people are fighting for self-determination, the freedom to live and not just grovel to survive on a dollar a day in a repressive system while others enjoy the benefits of their stolen labor and resources.

People everywhere want the right to build their own economies with their own resources that benefit their children and their people.

They want to freely associate both economically and culturally with whomever they wish.

They want a dynamic, equitable world built on true justice, peace and mutually-respected independence.

We can and must be part of that future.

As white people organized under the leadership of the African People’s Socialist Party, working for the liberation of Africans everywhere and in solidarity with oppressed and struggling peoples across the globe, we know there will never be peace without this vision.

That’s why we say “Reparations—there can be no justice without it.”

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We must separate ourselves from identifying with the U.S. government and its expectations of unity, a white nationalist unity, and mindless apathy that has us  fighting for our own interests at the expense of the rest of the world…”;  Read full post on Author’s site

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Racist Police Brutality Part I: History of The American Police State

Re-blogged from a post by Agyei Tyehimba gyei Tyehimba on My True Sense.org

Why does Police Brutality Exist?

“…As Hip Hop legend Jay Z has said, “Men lie and women lie, but numbers don’t.”  Nor do numbers lie concerning Black death by white hands. According to the 2012 “Operation Ghetto Storm” report by the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, statistics taken between January and June of that year demonstrated that a “Black person was killed every 36 hours by white police, security guards or self-appointed vigilantes.”

Disturbing data like this compels the intelligent and concerned among us to ponder why Black lives in so-called “post-racial America are still criminalized and devalued. All across this country, Black people seething with righteous indignation are protesting and discussing how to protect ourselves from agents of the American police state (the second part of this series will focus on this issue.)

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Concerning this question of resolution, I’ve heard and read intelligent and well-meaning Black folk offer the same traditional approaches we always hear regarding police brutality: Marches, demonstrations, rallies, protests, teach-ins, filming police, police sensitivity training, clinics on how to cooperate with and peacefully engage police, and the like. While I am not completely resistant to these strategies, I am admittedly  skeptical. I am inclined to believe that our wholehearted and patriotic devotion to such methods reeks of naivete.

.Somehow we have come to believe that murderous and repressive police are acting outside of their official duties. And this is where we are wrong. The first intelligent step toward ending or at least effectively neutralizing police brutality is to understand the sociopolitical role and function of police in the United States.

Understanding the true role of police in our nation requires that we know the true history of police forces in this country. Mainstream scholars of police history spin the narrative that America inherited its idea of policing from Britain in the form of constables and night watchmen. According to most accounts, early forms of public policing began first in Boston (1636), then New York City (1651), and then Philadelphia (1705). As populations grew and territories became more industrial and based on specialized labor, other cities adopted volunteer and later professional and more organized police departments.

This history is factually accurate, but does not explain the political and sociological function of police in modern society. For this, we must dig a little deeper and examine the development of police institutions in the early South. As you will see, this history helps us understand why police brutality is a mandated, deliberate, and organic part of our society.

The advent of police departments, if we trace its southern origins, began with slave patrols in the colonies and later states of America. As revealed in the article, “The History of Policing in the United States: Part I,”

Slave patrols had three primary functions: (1) to chase down, apprehend, and return to their owners, runaway slaves; (2) to provide a form of organized terror to deter slave revolts; and, (3) to maintain a form of discipline for slave-workers who were subject to summary justice, outside of the law, if they violated any plantation rules. Following the Civil War…”;  read full article on Author’s site

About the Author:  Agyei Tyehimba Agyei Tyehimba

Senzeni na? Marikana Justice Project

Re-blogged from:
 
 
 
“… Director, Sipho Singiswa, spent two years in Marikana gathering the narratives and songs of the people of Marikana before and after the terrible Marikana Massacre happened in August 2012.  With his film work he exposes the dire socioeconomic  conditions communities around extractive industries are made to endure by exploitative multinationals and government. 

This awareness raising advocacy film is told from the perspective of the men, women and children of Marikana as they struggle to come to terms with the police massacre of 34 men who were striking for a living wage.  It looks at the history of mining and cheap labour in South Africa and connects this to the current conditions workers endure in a democratic South Africa.  

 

What We Need & What You Get

We need a budget to:

  • Continue with the filming; hire in a high end DP to direct the footage to frame the film for an international audience;  hire studios to conduct formal interviews; pay for archive; hire translators, editors, scriptwriters and production staff; pay for post production and distribution as well as to travel with the film to raise awareness.
  • In return for a contribution you will either get a credit at the end of the film; get a special thanks poster; get a copy of the documentary; get a copy of the series of videos we have made; and mostly you would have been part of a social justice campaign that tells the human story of Marikana in solidarity with their struggle for social and economic justice.
  • If we do not reach the entire goal in funding we will use the funds to continue to share the voices in video on our Media for Justice site www.mediaforjustice.net  as an online social media series – for advocacy and education purposes.

 The Impact

  • Contributing to this project will go a long way in providing a much needed platform for the grievances of the community to be heard.  This project goes beyond the sound byte version of events.  It is about recording and sharing the deep narratives of people who are forced to carry the burden of a profit-driven society. 
  • Hearing the testimony of, and experiencing the day to day life of men, women and children in this community will go a long way to assist in their demand for justice and advocacy for a better life and proper living conditions. 
  • It calls for multinational and government  accountability and applies pressure for justice to be served to the Marikana widows, who lost husbands and breadwinners. 
  • It exposes the living conditions, the environmental conditions and the lived experience of communities living around mines in South Africa.
  • It unpacks the current model of politics which led to a heinous massacre reminiscent of the Sharpville massacre of the apartheid days.
  • It becomes a form of catharsis for community members who struggle to come to terms with this massacre of their people in their quest for a better life.
  • Video advocacy makes a big difference to community struggles and film becomes witness to atrocities and transgressions against communities. 
  • Media for Justice has followed, recorded and made public many transgressions by state or corporates against many communities and helped apply pressure on these transgressors for accountability.  
  • You can follow these projects here:  http://www.mediaforjustice.net/category/news-categories/socioeconomic-justice/page/2/…”; via @GillianSchutte

Find out more:  Go To Senzeni na? Marikana Justice Project

10 Things We Should NOT Teach Our Children

Re-blogged from: mytruesense.org

fatherchild1. “Race doesn’t matter.” The concept of “race” – that we can accurately determine one’s intelligence, ability, habits, attitudes or destiny based on their biological racial designation – is a lie and illusion. One’s biology does not determine any of these things which are mostly influenced by culture, observation and education. However “racism” is real. So it is more appropriate to teach our children not to judge people on anything but their deeds and actions and to do so on a case-by-case basis. At the same time, we must teach them that racism/sexism/class exploitation, and the brutality, prejudice, discrimination and injustice that accompanies them, does exist, and we should prepare them to identify and challenge these societal vices.

2. “Money is the root of all evil.” In fact, money is a measurement of purchasing power, a tool, and something we need in this system to provide for our basic necessities and luxuries. It is also a symbol of our material wealth. But it is not the root of all evil. The person that created this myth most likely didn’t want poor people to eliminate their poverty and acquire power. Ignorance, vanity, greed, competitiveness, selfishness, arrogance, a false sense of entitlement, avarice, insecurity, and jealously are far more accurate candidates for being the “roots of all evil.” Given this, perhaps we should teach our children that a. money is necessary in our modern economy b. having more of it will provide them with more options in terms of residence, education, food, clothing, entrepreneurship, political power, etc. So they should make plans to acquire it legitimately, budget and invest it wisely, and use it to provide relief to others. But they certainly should not fear, trivialize, or disdain it.

3. “Get a good education so you can get a good job.” It is true that a person with a college degree is more likely to earn a million dollars than a person without one. It is also true that a college education is highly regarded as one way to create more options for oneself. However, the purpose of formal or informal education is not to get a good job, but to primarily develop important contacts/networks, develop successful habits/attitudes, and to learn specific skills/knowledge that will enable a person to effectively pursue his/her goals. As a secondary consideration, we seek education to acquire the credentials for upward mobility. What one does with these credentials, habits, skills, knowledge and networks is their choice, but we must urge our children to use these resources to understand, create, own, run, influence, and control things in their environment. This is the basis of power.

4. “You must vote; it is your civic responsibility and our people died for this right.” Voting might be the powerful demonstration of citizenship we believe it to be if: candidates, the political structure the press and the electoral process were not controlled by corporations, the electoral college did not exist, and money in general did not affect the process. However, all of the above conditions exist, a fact that compromises our political options, our exposure to political ideas, and our vote. Our civic responsibility is to take actions that support humane policies, laws, options and consequences for citizens and to challenge those that don’t. How people choose to do that is another question. We would do more to help our children by teaching them how voting is compromised by money/corporations, how to intelligently research and identify candidates that align with their issues and interests, how to advocate for social causes, and how to amass economic, technological, and institutional power so that they don’t solely depend on politicians.

5. “Choose a partner that will love you the way you deserve to be loved.” This advice contains a kernel of truth, but so much more important information is omitted. In addition, a partner should be someone you are attracted to, can confide in, talk to, find refuge in, receive sound advice from, and whose skills, maturity, knowledge, habits and attitudes contribute significantly to your own peace and larger goals. They should respect you and your feelings, but also be able to challenge and correct you when necessary. When such things are in place, two people are “equally yoked.” Too many marriages, relationships and families have died brutal deaths because people failed to take these things into consideration, and focused too much on subjective feelings, and pleasure alone.

6. “Do as I say, not as I do.” Our actions and behaviors are far better teachers than our words. If we want our children to respect us, we must do our best to make our actions consistent with our words. Mixed messages only serve to undermine a solid relationship with our children, and they cause our children to distrust our advice and teaching. Besides, if there is a major difference between what we tell them and what we do, we are in essence, hypocrites anyway, unworthy of respect or emulation.

7. “I brought you in this world, and I’ll take you out.” Sounds strong and authoritative, but this saying is actually self-defeating and counterproductive. As parents, our role is to provide reasonable boundaries, provide direction, basic necessities, and sound habits and attitudes. It is far more appropriate to take the position that “I brought you in this world, and I will do everything I can to help you navigate it successfully.” A good parent should also provide discipline when appropriate, but never be a bully.

8. “No matter how disrespectful, irresponsible, and disobedient you are, I will still provide you with gifts to demonstrate my love for you.” Ok, we don’t actually…”;  Read full post on Authors site

photoAuthor – Agyei Tyehimba